Let’s Get Rid of RINOs!

Leave a comment

Michael Johns, U.S. Senate candidate Christine...

One would expect a political party too support its nominee unless the nominee holds overly radical views. Christine O’Donnell is not in that category, so the Delaware Republican Party should support its nominee enthusiastically. But when she defeated former Governor Mike Castle, a RINO (“Republican-in-Name-Only”), the state Republican establishment said it would not support her. To its credit, the national Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee supported her.

The Republican Party has long been divided three ways: into moderate/liberal Rockefeller Eastern establishment Republicans, into libertarian Republicans, and into traditional Conservatives. Another name for the Eastern establishment types is “Country Club Republicans.” They are basically Democrats in Republican guise. What Republicans in Delaware did was to vote in a true conservative, Tea Party supported candidate rather than a candidate of the old, tired establishment.

It is time for the Republican Party to purge itself of RINOs, especially the country club liberal Republicans. They have fought the party’s conservative base tooth and nail for years. They strive to divide the libertarians from the traditional conservatives so they can push their own agenda and candidates. They support Democratic big spending plans, support massive federal intervention into the economy and into the lives of Americans, and are every bit as liberal on social issues as Mr. Obama. The Tea Party movement has brought out conservative voters to remove these establishment candidates. This does not imply that the Tea Party candidates are always ideal, or that the Tea Party is correct on every issue–many Tea Partiers need to tone down warmongering and support the American interest foreign policy of Ron Paul. But they, at least, listen and are far more willing to change than comfortable establishment candidates.

The press, of course, along with the Country Club Republicans, are writing off Christine O’Donnell as a loser. Both the majority of people in the press and the majority of Country Club Republicans hate middle America and its conservative values. I remember talking to an older lady, very nice, but a Country Club Republican, about abortion. I was shocked at what she said to me: “We have to allow abortions so those poor black babies won’t be born into such bad environments.” I assure you that she is not the only Country Club Republican with that attitude. Comfortable in their gated communities, such “moderate” and liberal Republicans are quite confident in their beliefs about who is worthy to live and who is worthy to die. The Republican Party can do without people like that. It can do without their presence, their politicians, and their money. The only hope for the Republican Party becoming a true Republican Party is the Tea Party and other grassroots conservative movements bringing out the vote. Only then will more establishment candidates be replaced by those who truly desire the Republican Party to the conservative party of the United States, to curb spending and taxes, to give more power to the states and less to the federal government, to stop judges from making laws rather than interpreting them. But to do that, the RINOs have to go!

The Freedom of Christian Orthodoxy

3 Comments

Anglican Catholic Church

Image via Wikipedia

Over and over I hear opinion leaders say that traditional religion is constricting, and I will admit that some forms of traditional religion are. Radical Islam, radical Fundamentalist Christianity, and other fringe movements have given traditional religion a bad name. But I found since entering the Anglican Catholic Church in 1989 that orthodox Christianity is freeing, not binding.

All my life I have been a thinker, a philosopher, someone who wonders at the hows and whys of the world. Growing up in Fundamentalist Christianity was not healthy for that kind of thought. But neither was my short stay in liberal Protestantism. For liberal Protestantism, there is no place to set one’s feet. Sands shift, opinions blow in the wind, and the only heresy is orthodoxy. Speculation without some foundation from which to speculate turns into anarchy, which is every bit as imprisoning as Fundamentalism. Contemporary liberal Protestantism reduces Christianity to a distortion of social justice, with the mantra of “race, class, gender” the only words that its brainwashed adherents can speak. To say that there is anything about Christianity that is important other than the political will get you excommunicated from liberal Christianity. I felt like a puppet on a string–I had more intellectual freedom in Fundamentalism.

When I discovered orthodox Anglicanism, I discovered the richness and breadth of the Catholic tradition. Within the boundaries of the great Creeds–the Apostle’s, the Nicene, and the Athanasian–and under the teaching of the bishops on moral and theological matters I could speculate to my heart’s content as long as such speculation did not become an idol. Within Christian orthodoxy, I can accept any metaphysics compatible with the basic teachings of Christianity. I am a Thomist along the lines of the late Fr. Norris Clarke of Fordham University, but I could hold many other metaphysical frameworks and still remain an orthodox Christian. There is even room for psychical research and parapsychology–even the most traditional Anglicans have been generally open-minded about psychical research in England, and European Roman Catholics, including Pope Pius XII, had no problem with research on electronic voice phenomena. If someone at the Rhine Center or SPR asked me how I could be such a traditional Christian and still accept psi and be open to the existence of ghosts, I would ask that person, “Why not?” Orthodox Christianity has boundaries, of course, but knowing those boundaries makes me comfortable in exploring what I can within those boundaries. The world remains full of wonder, and like a child I can explore it to my heart’s content as long as I remain within the limits God has set. I am grateful for that.