Suppose you are in third grade and a much bigger kid beats you up regularly, steals your lunch money, and otherwise makes your life miserable. This happens every school day and gets to the point that you dread going to school. One day another kid comes to you and says, “I’m tired of that big kid beating up on you. Next time I see him I’m going to beat him up.” You find that hard to believe; the boy has never helped you before and never seemed to care for anybody but himself. But the next time the bully attacks you, the other boy jumps in and beats the bully up. You trust the boy who helped you, and now you will do anything to help him. A year later, when he runs for homeroom president, you are his biggest supporter.

Today many people in the United States feel bullied. Some feel bullied by the bankers and investment firm CEOs that helped create the 2008 crash that left millions of people without jobs. Others are Evangelical Christians who feel beaten down and silenced by politically correct bullying by both the Left and Right. Others who may not be Evangelical Christians are still tired of so many people getting offended at anything a person says and using that offense to bully someone out of a job, often ruining the person’s career. It seems that speaking itself will become a crime one day.

Then Donald Trump walks into the room. He is crude, he is crass, and he has no regard for what he says nor how much he offends others. He is definitely not politically correct, something protesters at his rallies understand, which is one reason they hate him. For the non-elites, the common people who feel bullied, Trump comes across as a savior. “If Trump were in, he wouldn’t let any of these jerks intimidate him. He’d just tell political correctness to go to hell.” Trump comes across to many people as the rescuer, just like the rescuer of the bullied boy in the story. Thus Trump’s supporters will be loyal to him and are willing to do anything they can to help him get elected.

I voted for Ted Cruz because I am not sure Mr. Trump is stating his true convictions–he seems to be saying what people want to hear in order to get elected. However, “I’m mad as hell” with political correctness myself, and understand the appeal of Mr. Trump. If he gets the Republican nomination, I will probably vote for him in the general election. It is risky, and I would vote with trepidation, but like many people, I am sick and tired of being intimidated by elites who try to silence speech with which they disagree. If Mr. Trump can put a dent in that trend, that, at least, would be a good thing.

 

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